<html> <head> <title>Rule 12:26:01:04 Terms defining condition of the white.</title> <META NAME="Keywords" Content="Administrative Rules 12:26:01:04"> <META NAME="Description" Content="Administrative Rules 12:26:01:04 Terms defining condition of the white."> <meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Office HTML Filter 2.0"> <meta http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=windows-1252"> <meta name=Originator content="Microsoft Word 10"> <style> <!-- --> </style> </head> <body lang=EN-US> <div> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <b>12:26:01:04.&nbsp;&nbsp;Terms defining condition of the white.</b> The following terms define the condition of the white in determining the quality of individual eggs:</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; (1)&nbsp;&nbsp;&quot;Clear,&quot; a white that is free from discolorations or from any foreign bodies floating in it. Prominent chalazas are not foreign bodies, but meat spots or blood clots are foreign bodies;</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; (2)&nbsp;&nbsp;&quot;Firm,&quot; (AA quality) a white that is sufficiently thick or viscous to prevent the yolk outline from being more than slightly defined or indistinctly indicated when the egg is twirled. A firm white of a broken-out egg has a Haugh unit value of 72 or higher when measured at a temperature between 45 degrees and 60 degrees Fahrenheit;</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; (3)&nbsp;&nbsp;&quot;Reasonably firm,&quot; (A quality) a white that is somewhat less thick or viscous than a firm white. A reasonably firm white permits the yolk to approach the shell more closely which results in a fairly well defined yolk outline when the egg is twirled. A reasonably firm white of a&nbsp; broken-out egg has a Haugh unit value of 60 to 72 when measured at a temperature between 45 degrees and 60 degrees Fahrenheit;</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; (4)&nbsp;&nbsp;&quot;Weak and watery,&quot; (B quality) a white that is thin and generally lacking in viscosity. A weak and watery white permits the yolk to approach the shell closely, causing the yolk outline to appear plainly visible and dark when the egg is twirled. A weak and watery white of a broken-out egg has a Haugh unit value lower than 60 when measured at a temperature between 45 degrees and 60 degrees Fahrenheit;</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; (5)&nbsp;&nbsp;&quot;Blood spots,&quot; blood spots on the surface of the yolk or floating in the white not due to germ development. These blood spots may have lost their characteristic red color and appear as small spots or foreign material commonly referred to as meat spots. Eggs with blood spots or meat spots not more than one-eighth inch in diameter may be classified as B quality. Eggs with diffused blood spots or those larger than one-eighth inch shall be classified as loss;</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; (6)&nbsp;&nbsp;&quot;Bloody white,&quot; a white which has blood diffused through it. Eggs with bloody whites shall be classified as loss.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <b>Source:</b> SL 1975, ch 16, &nbsp;1; 8 SDR 89, effective January 24, 1982; 12 SDR 128, 12 SDR 154, effective July 1, 1986; 17 SDR 122, effective February 24, 1991.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <b>General Authority:</b>SDCL <A HREF="/statutes/DisplayStatute.aspx?Type=Statute&Statute=39-11-7">39-11-7.</A></p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <b>Law Implemented:</b>SDCL <A HREF="/statutes/DisplayStatute.aspx?Type=Statute&Statute=39-11-7">39-11-7.</A></p> </div> </body> </html>